Tag Archives: Film Industry

In : Film and Media Comments : 0 Author : Quickclass Team Date : 11 Aug 2017

Panic, dread, fear and anguish. 4 emotions that cinema chain owners, studios and everyone along the distribution process in Hollywood are all currently feeling.

Remember last year, when an idea was running around of a home movie service that would allow people to watch new cinema releases from the comfort of their coach? Screening Room it was called – as if Netflix hadn’t done enough damage already.

In March of this year, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings even made headlines for making the claim that the movie chains hadn’t innovated in 30 years, stating the only advantage of them is “well, the popcorn tastes better, but that’s about it.”

While most people think Netflix is some huge company disrupting the whole distribution industry – this is only half-true. If we take a step back then we see it’s only the tip of the iceberg. Netflix seems to have merely affected the way that films and, more generally, content, reaches its audience audiences.

That is fantastic for big TV and film producers, but doesn’t mean much for independent filmmakers, yet. In fact, most indie films sold to these new digital distribution channels went to Amazon rather than Netflix; for example, Kenneth Lonergan’s harrowing Manchester by the Sea and Best Picture Oscar winner Moonlight. You can really see the touch of veteran indie film producer, Ted Hope, who is now helming Amazon Studios.

If we consider this within a different context, music for example, most of us now take for granted that we’re going to listen to music on Spotify or Apple Music. If we really want to buy music, we’ll go on iTunes and buy digital files as opposed to physical CDs or vinyl. This is a drastic shift, and one which has caused a surge in independent music. A small band that you love can now record its music in their garage and upload it for the world to listen, all done from their laptop. It’s easy to forget how radical that notion was even 20 years ago: really revolutionising an entire established industry and opening it up to smaller players.

The film industry is also going through profound changes, and cinemas will have to adapt to survive. Netflix is just a traditional company, nothing incredible, but they sure know how to make the most of the new wave of digital technologies. It’s just like the 2008 financial crisis: you can look at it as a phenomenon in and of itself, or you can look at it as a ripple in a bigger, wider undercurrent. But how will this wave affect us, the independent filmmakers? Will we eventually have the same channels indie music has, and just upload our movies (and actually make money from them)?

Netflix and Amazon haven’t figured this out yet. They haven’t worked out how to make production as simple as it could be, or as DIY as independent filmmakers are used to. But it’s not all doom-and-gloom, because that’s actually where the power of independent filmmakers lie: you can shoot how you like, improve your work, put it out on social media and, if you have enough following, you can reach enough people to get noticed – the only missing piece is making it a real business model.

Hollywood, digital distribution channels, and independent filmmakers: how these 3 puzzle pieces will eventually fit together is yet to be seen. However we predict that Hollywood will adapt to appease the likes of Netflix and Amazon, whilst indie filmmakers will (hopefully) hop on great new channels to distribute themselves.

Source: Baptiste Charles, Raindance Filmschool 

In : News Comments : 0 Author : Quickclass Team Date : 12 Dec 2016

It’s well known that jobs in any niche industry are hard to come by and the film industry is no different. This article will cover some of the more conventional ways into the film business and then some unconventional ways that have popped up over the past few years.

Apprenticeships are great way to learn whilst also earning money. This involves working onsite and being trained while you work. In an industry that runs on who you know, this can be a great way to show what you’re worth and begin networking. There are laws that protect you being overworked and underpaid. Employers are looking to see if you’re enthusiastic about the industry and what your skills are. What they’re after is passion and whether you can communicate effectively.

A degree is an additional route but has less chance of success. It’s not as focused on practical work in the film industry as an apprenticeship would be but you learn a whole wealth of knowledge that prepares you for many jobs instead of narrowing down in a sector. You’ll want to research what universities have good links to the industry. As we’ve mentioned, finding a job means knowing the right connections. Many universities offer the chance for their students to go and work on projects with real producers and directors. More importantly, towards the end of your degree, many institutions set up days where you can show off what you’ve created to industry insiders.

The type of degree you choose should  depend on what aspect of the film industry you’re trying to gain entry to. If it’s writing, then a Creative Writing degree might be appropriate. If you’re looking for something more general, then a bachelors in Film and Television might suit you better. Earning a degree also offers you the chance to enter other areas of work outside of film. The long term nature of a degree means you will have the chance to do creative work and gain a good idea of whether it’s something you want to do as work.

As the film and media sphere gets turned on its head by the revolutionary ways to share and monetise video content, there are new avenues that one can take to get your foot in the door. These are risky and unorthodox but might tempt the most passionate to give them a try. Being an online content creator is a 21st century job and the type of content you create is pretty much up to you. There are trends you can ride but it’s best to do your own thing. There are different platforms such as Youtube, Twitter, Vimeo, and Twitch. Thousands of people are trying to strike their claim in these markets and it’s fiercely competitive but the rewards can be great.

Gaining a viewership online opens up the chance for sponsorship. Companies will literally come to you to advertise their products. Once you’ve shown the world what you can do it also proves to industry insiders that you might do well with a more traditional means of production, i.e., it becomes vastly easier to get your projects greenlit. Becoming famous online is near impossible to plan and no one would recommend it as a career path but if you’re able to put out content while working a daily job or studying in school it might just be worth a go. The worst case is you gaining a bunch of experience and a portfolio.